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Ufoji^.C#. A 




ABRIDGED EDITION. <« - n "\ fT 

)l.H.C.HART'S 

3STET7CT Ji-TSTID IMDPIRO^riEID INSTBUOTOB FOR THE 






WITH ORiaiNAL JSTOT.A.TIOlSr. 



Price 20 Cents. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1S62, by FI. C. HART, : n the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of Sew York. 

Containing- FULL INSTRUCTIONS FOR BEATING THE DRUM— OYER FORTY MARCHES, QUICK STEPS, CAMP, FIELD 

A.ND BATTLE ("ALLS, selected from the original work, which has received the approval of some of the most experienced drummers in 
the country, who have pronounced it to be the best and most practical work on drumming ever published, (see testimonials on last page.) 

A new, enlarged and improved edition of the original work is now completed by the author, with Bass Drum parts attached, containing 

" ; eces for that instrument, accompanying each beat for the Drum. 
with Explanations of Signals for the Drum Major, Positions and 
Reviews and Escorts. 




PUBLISHED BY WILLIAM HALL <fc SON, 

543 Broadway, 



Between Spring and Prince Streets, 



NEW YORK. 






Manufacturers of Piano Fortes, Guitars, Flutes, and Brass Instruments, &c., &c., Publishers of Music, Importers and Dealers in all kinds of Music 

and Musical Instruments. 



SSI 



INTRODUCTION 



No. 1. The author, having yielded to the solicitations of many friends and acquaintances, hoth civil and military, to 
publish his experience in the principles and science of Beating the Drum, and thinking it might add encouragement to 
the interest beginning to manifest itself throughout the country in martial music, which is so well adapted to the 
field and camp, and so well appreciated, (when well performed), by officers and soldiers generally, will endeavor to 
set them forth in so full, plain, and instructive a manner that the pupil will be able to sec and comprehend them at 
once. Yery few principles and characters in music, can be tised or applied practically and successfully in teaching 
scientifically the Art of Drumming, except those of time and measures. Therefore, an original system will be introduced, 
which the author adopted and followed for many years with marked success in teaching, after receiving a thorough 
practical course of instructions from the Drum Major of the Military Academy at Middletown, Conn., under Professor 
Patridge. 



No. 2. REMARKS AND EXPLANATIONS. 

First let me remark, as an experimental fact, (which must be 
admitted by all professional Drummers), that all Blows, Taps, 
Flams, or Single Beats have but one length of sound on the 
Drum, therefore I would use but four principal characters in 
drumming, from which originate all the beats necessary to a 



perfect performance of any piece of music on the Drum, to 
ivit, a blow, a flam, a three roll closed, and a rest, all of which 
will be designated and explained hereafter, together with ail 
the rolls and beats originating therefrom, which the pupil 
should become practically acquainted with before attempting 
to beat tunes, to warrant speedy success. 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



HtSOD 



3 



No. 3. POSITION OF THE PUPIL, HOLDING-DRUM, 

STICKS, &c. 

The position of the pupil should be the erect, easy attitude 
of the soldier, elbows close to the hips, the left hand raised 
about as high as the hip or joint of the elbow, the right hand 
raised about half as high as the left ; the Drum, hanging natur- 
ally from a belt or sling about the neck, should rest against 
the left leg immediately above the knee. The right hand stick 
should be held snug, with the whole hand closed, the ball of 
the thumb against the side of the first finger joint, the stick 
just balancing where the thumb and first finger grasp it. The 
left hand stick should rest in the hollotf of the thumb and first 
finger, between the first and second joifits of the second and 
third fingers, and held by the thumb anq the two first-fingers — 
the ball of the thumb against the side of the first finger joint, 
and this stick should balance where it jests between the second 
and third fingers. 



quare upon the head of 



No. 4. OP MOVEMENT OP ARMS AND SHOUL 
DERS, BEATING DftUM, &c 

I would insist that the pupil beat 
the drum, and as near the center of tt i head as possible, make 
no drawing strokes or sideway beats in no case whatever, al- 
though it has been recommended by many professional 
teachers of drumming. Care shouldpe taken that all amotions 



of the sticks, or blows on the drum, be performed by turning 
or rolling the wrists, and not by motions of the arms or shoul- 
ders. In some cases, whei-e a little exertion is required, a slight 
up and down motion of the fore-arm, and an outward motion 
of the elbows from the hips may occur, but these movements 
should be guarded against as much as possible, and especially 

in practicing on the rolls and beats. 

t 

No. 5. CHARACTERS USED, EXPLAINED. 

The four characters I propose to use are, 

First, a, full flam, thus f 

Second, a full blow, thus • 

Third, a three roll, closed, thus V 

Fourth & full rest, thus J£ 

all of which are equivalent to quarter notes in divisions of 
time or measures in common music, but in the Drum Notation 
I shall call them full beats or characters. Then I will use, 

a hard, quick flam, thus f 

a hard quick blow, thus • 

and a half rest, thus r 

Each of these being equivalent to eighth notes in music, or 
half beats in measures of time in the drum notation. I also 
use the full open flam, thus °- , the full open blow, thus ° , 
and the full open three roll, thus V Q , all three being equal in 
.mwasui-es of .time to the three first full characters, which are 



* 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



beat heavy, while these three open characters will he exe- 
cuted soft and light, as will also the two following charac- 
ters, the small open jlam, thus ? , and the small open blow, 
thus ° ; each of which are equal in divisions of time and 
measures to eighth notes or half beats on the Drum. 

The pupil will understand that the five lines upon which 
music is written are called a staff, and the three lines upon 
which I arrange the new characters for the drum, will be called 
the Drum-staff, or Drum-Notation, being new and original. 

No. 6. MEASURES OF TIME ILLUSTRATED. 

I will here illustrate the different measures of time by bars 
across the staff, exhibiting the variety of beats used : 

First, # double or quick time. 
4- 



* ? i v i.». ..; r* • .|| 


* • • e 1 o 1 6- o 11 



u.vi, 


* T 






u 


• ? 


o V 


? ' R |° R.jl 


\\+ 


i 


R • 


£ o B| i 11 



Third, ^ slow common, or quadruple time. 



Ul v • ? 1 • f 1 ° v • 1 ¥ • * J! 


1* o o 1 • Ml . o fti&xJ-A&k 



and J compound, or sextuple time. 



tftl 

(S-l 



IT 



also a J£ *nj??e, or quick waltz, and g time, half beats being 
used in each measure, or their equivalent in full beats or rests, 



the same as in 4£ time, 



V 



1-9-1 
1*1 



1 



The fine lines across the staff are called bars, and the 
spaces between them are called measures, 



aq y 
MEASURES. 



and all blows, flams, three rolls or rests, or their equivalent 
in half beats or rests, found between the bars across the staff, 
are called beats in a measure. There are a variety of rolls and 
beats that fill different measures in time, some more than one 
measure each, and some less, these will be explained hereafter. 

No. 1. REMARKS ON BEATING TIME. 

The pupil will notice in the preceding examples that there 

are two beats in a measure in % time, three beats in 3: time, 

■4- -4- 

ftui bfeats Sri 'M time, six half beats or eigth note3 in £ time, 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



and three eighth notes,or half beats in ifc time ; consequently in 

marking or beating time, the pupil will count one, two, for 
double, or :§: time ; one, two, three, for triple, or £ time ; one, 
two, three, four, for quadruple, or 4j time ; and one, two, three, 
four, five, six, for sextuple, or j& time, in a clear and uniform 

manner, at the same time beating the counts distinctly with 
the foot. 

No. 8. ON ACCENTING TIME, CLOSING ROLLS, 
BEATS, &c. 

% time is accented on the first part of each measure ; 

3: time is accented on the first and third parts of each measure ; 

£ time is also accented on the first and third parts of each 

measure ; and 
"&■ time is accented on the first and jourth parts of each 

measure. 
When the movement of £ time is rapid, it may be beat the 

same as s or double time ; when it is slow, it may be beat 

with three motions repeated, if preferred, jfc or jjt time may 

be accented the same as :§: time, and beat with the same move- 
4* 

ment as |i time. Before introducing the several beats 



and rolls which embody the main principles of drumming, 
let me say that there may be rolls and beats introduced 
that will not seem to fill full and separate measures of 
time, as set forth in the four or five principal rules above 
laid down, (which in the main are sufficient for all practical 
purposes in drumming) ; therefore, should any of these rolls or 
beats occur not explained, they must be connected or divided 
by the ear of the performer, as in some fancy side beats where 
uniformity in measure of time are not strictly observed. The 
pupil will also find, by experience, that there are other measures 
and variations, in the beating of time, that are not materially 
necessary to be adopted in performing with good taste, field, 
and martial music on the drum, although founded upon scien- 
tific principles and often used in the more complicated varieties 
of music. There is no necessity of counting or beating time 
in practicing on the rolls and beats. The most particular . 
thing to be observed is uniformity in beating, and I wish the 
pupil to bear this in mind, as it will not be separately ex- 
plained with every beat or roll. First, commence slow and 
always with the left hand; let every blow be distinctly heard, 
and continue to beat faster and faster until each separate roll 
or beat is closed smoothly and fine, and wherever a break or 
an irregularity in beating occurs while closing down the rolls 
or beats, commence back again where you can beat them 
plain and even, and so continue to practice, closing them down 



6 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



until perfected in a close roll, and until you have become 
practically acquainted with the several beats and their changes 
from hand to hand, as laid down, remembering to commence 
with the left hand, and that the beats on the upper line are 
to be executed with the left, and those on the lower line with 
the right hand. 

No. 9. DRUM STAFF AND NEW NOTATION 
EXPLAINED. 

I write music for the drum on two lines with an intermediate 
line, in place of the staff used in common music. All Blows, 
Flams, Rolls, or Beats, found upon the upper line, are to be 
executed with the left hand ; and all those on the lower line 
are to be executed with the right hand. Wherever a part, or 
parts of tunes are to be repeated, it 
will be indicated by two Dots be- 



fore the bar at the end of 
part to be repeated, thus, 



each 



* 

* 



And where the whole tune is to be repeated, 
it will be represented by two extra dots 
between the double bars, which always 
indicate the end of a tune or beat, thus, 

All Beats for the Drum should commence with full measures, 
although composers for the Fife, and performers on that in- 



I 



strument, sometimes commence tunes with full measures, and 
sometimes with parts of measures, the balance being made 
up at the end of the tune; this, apparently, is regulated agree- 
able to the taste of the composer or performer. Having carefully 
examined music for the Fife compared with the Drum Xotation, 
when performed together, they harmonize best when the 
Drum commences with full measures, even though the Fife 
commences and ends with parts of measures. 

No. 10. THE DIFFERENT ROLLS ILLUSTRATED 
AND EXPLATNED. 

Lesson I. — The two Stroke or Long Roll, an Exercise. — 
The pupil will commence the long Roll by striking two 
blows with the Left hand ; then two blows with the Right 
hand ; and so on, alternately changing hands, and steadily in- 
creasing faster and faster until perfected in a close, smooth Roll. 

THE TWO STROKE, OR LONG ROLL ILLUSTRATED. 




As an Exercise, this Roll may be reversed from a closed 
Roll, to plain open beats, as used in commencing, by the pupil, 
but it is not necessary for the pupil to spend time in reversing 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



7 



£he two Stroke Roll, or in practicing on the single stroke fol- 
lowing, only to get the use of the sticks 

Lesson II. — The Single Stroke is performed in the same style 
as the two Roll, except that we use only one blow with each 
stick, alternately changing from Left to Right, and from light 
to Left. 

THE SINGLE BLOW EXERCISE. 



' ' • . 

• 



Lesson LTI. — The Three Boll open is performed by striking 
two hard, quick blows with the left, then one full blow with 
the right, then two hard quick blows with three rolls open. 
the right hand, and one full blow with the 
left hand, thus, 



and so on, alternately changing hands till CL0SEI) three roll. 
perfected in a closed three Roll, represented 
in the drum notation, thus, 



V 



A 



the two first blows, appearing to be nearly silent, as they in 
fact are when closed to the fine. They can be practiced as 
they are used, either single from hand to hand, as illustrated 



above, or collectively, first all left, and then all right, as illus- 
ti'ated, thus, 

THE THREE ROLLS CLOSED. 



IV V V V 


• • • VI 
1 


• • • • 


1 A A A A "1 



Lesson IV. — The Flam, as an Exercise illustrated. — The 
Flam is performed by striking a very soft, fine blow, with one 
hand, and a full heavy blow immediately following with the 
other, from left to right, and from exercise. 

right to left, alternately changing 
hands, thus, 



.11 



The characters representing 
the full and half Flam, both 
heavy and light, are illustrated, 
thus, 



FLAMS AS IN THE NEW NOTATION. 



4 I 



ii 



Those representing the left hand flams, are on the upper 
line, and those for the right hand on the lower line. 

Lesson V. — The Seven Roll. — It commences with the left 
hand, and closes with a right hand single blow, which gives 
accent to the Roll, as illustrated, thus, 

THE SEVEN ROLL. 



Til 



INSTRUCTOR FOR; THE DRUM. 



8 

There is no actual necessity of changing hands with the 
Seven Roll, which will always be represented by a figure 



Seven, thus, / in the Stafi' or Drum Notation, except where 
it is to be beat softly ; then it will be represented by an open 
figure Seven, thus, 



Lesson YI.— The five Roll or Bolls. — They commence first 
with the left hand and end with the left, then commencing 
with the right and ending with the five rolls. 
the right, changing hands alter- 
nately, as illustrated, thus, 



sson VII. — The Nine Roll. — This can be commenced and 
clo&d either with the left hand or with the right, changing 
hanjls alternately. It may be practiced both ways, but is 
useqoftener, where it would be more the nine roll single. 
easy! and natural to commence it || 
withkhe right hand, thus, ll , « » » 

I will also illustrate the Nine Roll as commencing with the 
left ajid right hand, changing alternately, thus, 

the nine rolls reversed 



-J 



and are always represented by figure Five on the upper and 

lower lines of the staff; the upper figure 

being the left hand roll, and the lower figure 'J «5 J «5 •!! 
the right hand roll, as here presented, thus, I l& 1 & ll 



Where they are to be beat softly, they 
will be represented by open figure Fives, 
thus, • 



A light accent should be placed on the last blow of the Five 
Roll, as well as all other Rolls used. 



The Nine Roll will be represented in the staff by the figure 
Nine, thus, \jB and if to be executed light, will be represented 



by an open figure Nine, thus, 

Lesson VIII. — The Eleven Roll. — Commence left and right, 
and change hands alternately, thus, 

THE ELEVEN ROLL SINGLE AND REVERSED. 



II 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



9 



It is always represented in the staff by the nunber Eleven, 

thus, J.i; if to be beat softly, by an open nunber Eleven, 

thus, 1 1- The Eleven Eoll is more general!' used, com- 
mencing with the left hand. 

The Fifteen Roll, commencing with the left hind, is illus- 
trated, thus, 

FIFTEEN ROLL. 



and i3 always represented by the numberFifteei, thus, "H JS 

except when required to be beat softly, then itis represented 
in the staff by the open number Fifteen, thus, i K 

No. 11. ROLLS WITH ACCENTED BLOWS. 

There are no such Beats as the Six, Eight, Ten, Twelve and 
Sixteen Rolls ; they are 5, 7, 9, 11 and 15 Rolls,properly speak- 
ing with an extra blow added ; the accent comng on the extra 
blow, and not on the last blow of the Rolls proper, as illustrated, 
thus, 





FIVE ROLL AND BLOW. 




• • o • • » II 

'HI 


e e • a • a 





SEVEN ROLL AND BLOW. 




NINE ROLL AND BLOW. 




II 


i o o a a © 


:ll Ji- 

19 II 


• 9 a a 


•J 


II 


a a • 


o * a a a 


! 







ELEVEN ROLL AND BLOW. 




II 1 


a 


a a a 
a a 


'] 


II 1 




• m a a a 


I 





FIFTEEN ROLL AND BLOW. 








II 






II 


« » * * a a 


a 


• 





No. 12. REMARKS ON ROLLS AND BEATS, 

with Explanations, relative to the Measures or Parts of Measures 
they severally represent in divisions of time. 

In % quick time, the full open Seven Roll is equal to two 
eights notes, half Beats, or Flams. 

In ^ slow common time, the full open Seven Roll is equal 
to two full Beats, or quarter notes. 

In \ time, the full open Seven Roll is equal to three Beats, 
or quarter notes, in a measure. 

In £ time, the full open Seven Roll is equal to four eighth 
notes, or half Beats, in divisions of time. 



io 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM 



Open Rolls are those not connected with any others imme- 
diately preceding or following them, either of their own or 
any other denominations. 

A very close Five, Seven, or Fine Roll, with an extra Blow 
connected, can he executed in the same time of the several 
Rolls, when beat open and full. 

Where two or more Five, Seven, or Fifteen Rolls are con- 
nected, all after the first will be shortened one fourth in mea- 
sure of time, unless a fractional rest is connected with them, 
indicating that they are to be beat open and full. 

The Five Roll is equal to half the number of beats repre- 
sented by the Seven Roll in the staff. 

The Eleven Roll is equal to one Seven and one Five Roll, 
and the Fifteen Roll is equal to two Seven Rolls, in divisions 
of time, and the Nine Roll closed, is equal to the Seven Roll 
open. 

Where any beats occur in the staff, connected with the 
Five, Seven, Nine, Eleven, or the Fifteen Rolls, upon which 
the accent sbould come instead of the last Blow of tbe several 
Rolls, they will be indicated by a dot above the line imme- 
diately over them. 

A slur inclosing a figure three, thus, -T"% will be placed 
over or under the quick Paradiddle, the three quick single Blows, 
the four quick single Blows, and the seven double quick single 
Blows, indicating that they are, severally, to be executed in 



D 



the time of tk> eighth notes, or half Beats in divisions of time ; 
should they ie immediately preceded or followed by a three 
Roll, or a File, Seven, Nine, or Eleven Roll, they will always 
represent onV two eighth notes, in measures or divisions of 
time, the sane as when disconnected. 

No. 13. THJ SEVERAL BEATS ILLUSTRATED AND 
EXPLAINED. 



Lesson L— The single Paradiddle, thus, 



• \ • • • 



• • • • 



• > • 



II 

II 



The pupil will remember to practice closing all the Beats 
the same as the Kolls, commencing with the left hand, con- 
tinue repeating Diem faster and faster, alternately changing 
from hand to hakd until he is practically familiar with all 
of them. 

Lesson LT. — Trk Flam Paradiddle, thus, 



• • e 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



11 



Lesson EX— The Full Flam, thus, 



? ? 



£ & 



Lesson IV. — The Flamadiddle, 
thus, • — • 



Lesson V.— The Full Flam and Blow, 
thus, 

Lesson VI.— The Full Blow and Flam, 
thus, 



i . 



Lesson VII.— The half Flam and 
two half Blows, thus, 

Lesson VEIL— The half Blow, half 
Flam and Full Blow, thus, 



i • B 



• • 



• 



Lesson LX— The Full Flam and half 
Blow, thus, , 



l-i 



Lesson X. — The Full Flam and 
two half Blows, thus, 

Lesson XI. — Three Full Slow Open 
Blows, thus, 



Lesson XH.— Three Quick Beats 
or Single Blows, thus, 



Lesson XIII. — Three 
Roll and Four Quick 
Single Blows, thus, 



Lesson XTV. — One Full Blow and 
Three Roll, thus, 



Lesson XV.— The Full Three 
Roll and Two Half Beats, thus, 



? * 



© • 



• 



• a 



3 


— 


v • • - 


• • 1 


• • 


A • • '19 



V 











A 



— 


v • 


• " 


• 


A . il 



12 



INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM. 



The Quick Three Roll and 
Two Quick Beats. 



The Double Drag Beat, Three Roll 
Blow and Three Roll Quick. 



v * 


' - 1 


v • • 


' v J 


• e 


A e "1 


1 e A 


A . • 1 



The Quick Three Roll and Three 



Quick Single Blows. 




The Paradiddle Drag Beat. 


v • • • • 


— 


| v • • • • • I 


e • A • • 


1 • • • Ac • 1 



The Single Drag Beat, or 
Quick Three Roll and Blow. 



The Compound Double Drag Beat. 



V 



A 



V 



9 • • 



"V 



A A 



• © e I 



The Triple Compound Drag Beat, or the Seven Quick Single Blows. 



























3 














a 




e 




• 




' 




e 




.9 




* II 






e 




9 




o 




. 




• 




e 







11 



A Reversed Flam Paradiddle. 



The Open Double and Single 
Flam Drag Beat. 



• * * • J • . • ? J ? • 

• o • is I i e I » • it 



No. 14, Explanations. — Let me here remark, that the Seven Roll will only re- 
present two Eighth Notes or half Beats in 2-4 time, and the full characters, Blows, 
Flams or Rests, will be counted only equal to half Beats or Eighth Notes in 2-4 time, 
also the half Beats will only represent Sixteenth Notes in measures or divisions of 
time, in all 2 4 Qnick Steps. I will also say that the Seven Roll in 6-8 time more 
generally represents four Eighth Notes, although often represents but three in mea- 
sures of time. 

No. 15. There are Rolls of the Drum called Cheers, given as honors to certain 
officers, also introduced with different Beats or Calls. A single Cheer comprises 
about thirty-one Blows of the long Roll, performed with a gradual swell, in the time 
of about four steps or two measures of 2-4 time, as here illustrated. 

FIFE. THE THREE CHEEKS. 

tr _-*^ tr 






31 


31 


3 1 




1-2- 


— First Cheer. — 


-Second Cheer- 


— Third Cheer. — 


°« v | 


o oil 



No. 16. The Reveille is beat at sunrise, a signal for soldiers to turn out and 
assemble for Roll Call. It is composed of 8 parts, and commences with the Three 
Camps, see p. 13. In the Reveille they should be repeated ; they are beat only once 
through after the Doctor's Call. After the Three Camps there should be a short 
Roll, while the Fifer rests, and it should be repeated between each part, for second 
part, the Slow Scotch, see No. 38, page 17 ; third part, the Austrian, see No. 22, 
page 14 ; fourth part, the Dutch, see No. 36, page 18 ; fifth part, the Hessian, see 
No. 35, page 18 ; seventh part, see No. 38, page 17 ; eighth part, Quick Scotch, 6ee 
No. 34, page 18, first eighth measures, then end with Three Camps. 



TSTo. 17.-POLICE DKXTMiMEXft'S GAJKJL*. 



13 



* r I Aii ^ II Ait . r a i i tf • i i • iii a iii" 



No. 18.-DOCTOK'S CALL. 



#=£££=P^i 



'4r I -*■»- 



ksSSD ^^M~ 



-t— 1— t- 



;g£±*£*zi£: 



£>- 






-ff & & 



=t=L 



*-*-- 



No. 18.-DOCTOR'S CA.LIL,. 












||* R| Rl Rl R.S^ V # 


1 ? • ' 

,1c. 




1 ? * 

. 1 i . 


* If.lffWf 1 

. .1 i I 1 1 J 




11*1 i 1 £ Ili'Ti II * , 





TAen close with the 





THREE CA.IVIPS. 

• • 


• 


\* 

1* 


r*mfi&7 9 uM*kffl*mtfm 


[J* S-l *5 5 1 


i/ ^ FH *S l 



No. 19. CALL TO GO FOR WOOD. No. 20. CALL TO GO FOR WATER. 



1*1 i 



f I ? 



f 



? 



No. 91.-ASSEMBLY. Signal for Soldiers* to form t>y Companies. 



4- 



I 



-Repeat at option.- 



14 



TSTo. SS.-PEAS TJPCXN A. TRENCHER. Breakfast Call. Single Drag-. 




1 H F+*-V«h- 



^fe 



^ h^H -ffW^ 1 



«^±?± 



^fi 



n 



ISTo. SS.-PEAS TJIPOTS" A. TRENCHER. 



1-2- 
■4- 


V • 


| e V • | V • 


| • V • | v • | v • | • • 


1 ' V .11 


5 . 


1 A • o 1 5 . 


1 A . • 1 5 . 1 5 • 1 5 • 


1 A . . II 



No. 23. ASSEMBLY FOR GUARD MOUNTING. 



No. 24. ADJUTANT'S CALL. 



? ? 



I . 



-^,7 



f .r 



ffiirfl77£bfTk7ill 



No. 25. ORDERLY, OR FIRST SERGEANT'S CALL. 



No. 26. SERGEANTS' CALL. 



1 



IK 



K? 



Ri 



R? 



Fifteen Roll and four Flams, 
three times repeated. 



I R I R ! R .|| .E/eren Roll and three flams, three 

T ]) i t I t I i "II times repeated. 





No. 27. CORPORALS' CALL, 


4- 


1 JHL 1 Jot JU Eleven Rolls and two Flams, three times 
111 i \ i 11 repeaUd - 



No. 28. SOLDIERS' DRILL CALL. 



R 



555 555 I 555 1555 





No. 29. ALL OFFICERS' CALL 






No. 30. FIELD OFFICERS' CALL. 






1-2- 
1* 


py¥ ? KtWtK 


© • 1 

T 1 




4 R^ 


ri^I Riy 


? R| W?| a 


. .Ril 


"I i i 8 li 


• • R ! 


. . R i i i 



No. 33.-FATIGUE CALL. Pioneer's March. 

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No. 33.-FATIGUE CALL. 



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No. 34.- CHURCH CALL. 






No. 34.-CHURCH CALL. 






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No. 33.— THE COLORS. 



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No. 35. THE COLORS. 



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16 



3Vo. 31.— ROAST BEEF. Dinner Oall. A. I>ont>le Drag-. 



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No. 31.— ROAST BEEF. 






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When beat in Reveille or Tattoo as a Double 

Drag proper, leave out the two last measures 

at the word " end.'' 











End. 






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The Tattoo in six parts. First commence with three Cheers, then 
JSo. 33. — Tlie Doubling's of the Tattoo. To be repeated between each part. 

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ISTo. 3S.-The I>ont>lings of the Tattoo. 






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For Zd part of Tattoo, see No. 22, page 


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14, and for 5th part, see No. 31. 



No. 33.— QXJIOIC STEP. Eirst Part in Tattoo. 



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Repeat each part four times over. 



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Repeat ike Doubling* 



No. 3®.— THE RETIRED SOLDIER. A. Common Time, or March. 



17 



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5eaf /or 7fA part o/ Reveille, or Qth part of Tattoo. 



Repeat the Doublings and end with three Cheers. 





The Taps to extinguish Heights, half* an hour after Tattoo. 




1 


JK- mm, JCa-l iC JoL -ftS- j AS. if- Jl€J| To be repeated in each Street of the regimental camp, three at each end, and three 




j I []u at the centre in front of each company. 

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No. 39.— DOGS- AND Gi-TJN. General Salute. 

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No. 39.— STANDING SAJLTCJTE. 



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pfi'on of reviewing officers and as they 
pass down the lines. 


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No. 40.-GEENADIER'S QUICK: STEP. 

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18 ' 

]N"o. *A.— A. 2-4= Half* Time, or Paradiddle, Quick Step,— or Sd Part of" Tut too. 



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Third Part of Tattoo.— See No. 22, page 14. 

IVo. 35.- A. S-4 Flam: BEAT QUICK STEP. 



The Brum repeats the Doubling. 



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Hessian, or 5th part in Re 
veille, or 4th part in Tattoo' 



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My love is bxtt a lassie yet 
Roving Sailor. 
Soldier's Joy. 



TVo. 36.- r>TJT£E OF YORK'S TROOP. 




















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For the Dutch or 4th part of Reveille, Beat 1st part of the above Troop. 



IS"o. 3"T — THE GENERAX.. 


Signal to Strike Tents. 








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TAe General commences and ends with three Cheers. — After the last Roll or Cheer, repeat each part once through. 



TSo. 41.-DEAD MARCH. No. »t 



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No. -Otl DEAD MARCH. No. S. One Drum. 



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If two Drums, one makes a continuous Roll while the other marks the time only. 

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No. 42-FIELD SIGNALS FOR THE DRUM. 

1st. PREPARE FOR FIRING. 2d. COMMENCE FIRING. 



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3d. CEASE FIRING. 



4th. FRONT TO MARCH SLOW. 5th. DOUBLE QUICK. 



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6th. THE RUN. 



If standing, three Rolls or Flams, if marching take the Drum in left hand, and Beat 1'aps with the Right. 

7th. THE HALT. 





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To march in retreat, see Ao. 44. page 33. 



TE]STinv:o3sri^.i_iS. 



new york, July 20th, 18G2. ' 

I have heard Col. H. C. Hart, perform on the Drum, and must acknowledge 
that his skill cannot in my judgment be surpassed. 

He has shown me a work just published, explaining his system of teaching by 
a new notation, which is simple and plain. Such a work has been long needed to 
produce uniformity in martial music, now so various both in time and execution. 

It is to be hoped that Col H. C. Hart will receive such encouragement from 
Military men as will secure the adoption of his original mode of instruction, and 
make the martial music of our armies such as it should be. 

THOS. A. DAVIES, Brig. Gen. Vol. 
NEW york., July 22d 1862. 

I take pleasure in adding my testimony in favor of Col. H. C. Hart, as a gen- 
tleman, a soldier and an honorable man. 

Having had occasion to employ him to organize a Drum Corps for the 71st 
Regiment N. Y. S. M. now on duty in the field, he has done so, in a manner 
answering the commendation of the Officers and men of the Regiment. 

His work on Drumming, from the uniform testimonials furnished by gentle- 
men of my acquaintance, competent to judge, I have no doubt, will prove both 
useful and eminently satisfactory to all persons having use for the same. 

GEO. W. ROSEVELT, Quartermaster, 71st Regt. N. Y. S. M. 

Col. Hart— Dear Sir: July 23d, 1862. 

I must congratulate you upon your skill, in getting up your Drum Book. 

I have examined your book, and find it one of the best I have seen, and 1 
assure you I am something of a judge, from thirty-five years as a drumrner, and 
I can recommend it to the world. Your, ever ready friend, 

MATTHEW CONKLIN, Drum Major of Dodworth's Band. 

Camp Martix, Tennallytown. D. C. 71stReg't, N.- Y. S. M., June 25th, 18C2. 

H. C. Hart, Drum Major 71st Reg't. 

Sir :— I have taken occasion to examine, very carefully, the little " Instructor 
for the Drum'' you have published, and am much pleased to find that a subject 
on which I had heretofore failed to find any clear and simple treatise, is now 
made so plain. 



A method of notation for the snare drum, whereby the composer could ex- 
press for that instrument, as precisely what he intended as for the wind and 
stringed instruments, has been much wanted. Yours, although quite novel, is so 
simple that I am sure a good drummer must admit that you have supplied the 
want. I regard your work as a desirable acquisition in musical science. 

S. H. MAYNARD, Chairman Music Committee. 

New York, July 18th, 1.-02. 
Col. H. C. Hart, Sir : — I take great pleasure in informing you that I have care- 
fully perused your new and improved instructor for the drum, and am highly 
pleased with the originality of the system you have adopted for the young be- 
ginner, and i jel well convinced that any person, who will devote a part of his 
time and attention to your work, will eventually become a finished and perfect 
drummer. It is something which has long been needed in this country , and 
though many have attempted it, I must say you are the first I have found who 
has succeeded in reducing it to a simple, yet systematic work. 'Wishing you all 
success in the sale of your valuable work, 

I remain, yours respectfully, 

DAVID GRAHAM, Drum Major 7th Reg't N. Y S. M. 

New York, March 1st, 1862 
Col- H. C Hart, Dear Sir : — I am glad to learn that you are about opening a 
school of instruction for the drum. Judging from my knowledge of your ability 
as a teacher, your perfect execution as a drummer, and your success as a leader, I 
have no doubt of your success. Your military knowledge combined with the 
above, enables you to teach not only field music, but camp, field, and battle calls 
as well. I cannot forget the wonderful perfection to which the drum corps of 
the 102d Reg't. arrived many years since under your instruction. I therefore 
wish you success in your enterprise. Yours respectfully, 

LEVI ELMENDORF, formerly Drum Major of 102d Reg't. 

I have carefully examined H. C. Hart's Drum Instructor and find it entirely 
original and very simple, and cheerfully recommend it to all who desire to learn 
to drum correctly by a simple, easy method. 

TV'. V. WALLACE, Leader of Band, Hawkins Zouaves, N. Y. Vol. 


















mi 3